Events

Upcoming Lectures

Past Lectures

How immune cells help wire the brain: Implications for autism and psychiatric illness

Beth Stevens, Ph.D.Research Associate in Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School

On 2 November 2016, Beth Stevens discussed recent work that implicates brain immune cells, called microglia, in sculpting of synaptic connections during development and their relevance to autism, schizophrenia and other brain disorders.

One brain, many genomes: Somatic mutation and genomic variability in human cerebral cortex

Christopher Walsh, M.D., Ph.D.Chief of the Division of Genetics, Boston Children’s Hospital
Bullard Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School

On 27 April 2016, Christopher Walsh reviewed recent work on ‘somatic mutations’ — de novo mutations that are present in some brain cells but not in all cells of the body — in several neurological conditions associated with intellectual disability and seizures.

Development begins before birth: Prenatal research relevant to autism

Catherine Monk, Ph.D.Director of Research, The Women’s Program, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University

On 30 March 2016, Catherine Monk described her lab’s fetal origins of adult disease studies that focus on women in the perinatal period and fetal and infant neurobehavioral development, including direct studies of the fetus, newborn brain imaging and placental methylation.

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