Autism, autisms, or neurodevelopmental disorders?

  • Autism Research
Speaker Jason Lerch, Ph.D.
University of Oxford
Date & Time


Location

Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium
160 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10010 United States

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Tea 4:15 – 5:00 pm
Lecture 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm

Autism Research

Autism Research lectures bring together scientists and scholars to discuss diverse and important topics related to autism. The lectures are open to the public and are held at the Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium at the Simons Foundation headquarters in New York City. Tea is served prior to each lecture.

On January 29, 2020, Jason Lerch will explore this question: What do modern ways of looking at brains and genes tell us about autism – or autisms – and its relation to attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other related disorders of brain development?

His talk is part of the Simons Foundation Autism Research lecture series.

About the Lecture

If we had known back then what we know now, would we have the disorder names and categories that we do? In this lecture, Jason Lerch will explore that question: What do modern ways of looking at brains and genes tell us about autism –  or autisms  –  and its relation to attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other related disorders of brain development? He will present the unfolding view that separating individual disorders is difficult while at the same time there are not enough categories to make sense of a complex mix of symptoms, genes, and signatures in the brain.

About the Speaker

Jason Lerch is the director of preclinical imaging at the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging at the University of Oxford. Before his move to Oxford in 2019, he spent 14 years at the Mouse Imaging Centre at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. He completed his Ph.D. in 2005 in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. Lerch received his B.A. in 1999 in anthropology and social studies of medicine from McGill University. His Ph.D. research, under the supervision of Alan Evans, was on in vivo measurements of cortical thickness from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). His research focus is on detecting changes in the brain due to behavioral and genetic manipulations in tightly-controlled mouse models, primarily related to neurodevelopmental disorders, and to relate these findings to not-as-well-controlled human individuals.

Past Lectures

Altered somatosensory processing in autism spectrum disorders: Mechanisms and emerging therapeutic opportunities

David Ginty, Ph.D.Professor of Neurobiology, Harvard University

On April 24, 2019, David Ginty presented his work on the neurobiological basis of touch over-reactivity in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). He also discussed new pharmacological approaches aimed at reducing sensory over-reactivity and potentially improving cognitive and behavioral abnormalities associated with ASD.

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