Autism, autisms, or neurodevelopmental disorders?

  • Autism Research
Speaker Jason Lerch, Ph.D.
University of Oxford
Date & Time


Location

Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium
160 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10010 United States

Tea 4:15 – 5:00 pm
Lecture 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm

Autism Research

Autism Research lectures bring together scientists and scholars to discuss diverse and important topics related to autism.

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On January 29, 2020, Jason Lerch explored this question: What do modern ways of looking at brains and genes tell us about autism – or autisms – and its relation to attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other related disorders of brain development?

His talk was part of the Simons Foundation Autism Research lecture series.

About the Lecture

If we had known back then what we know now, would we have the disorder names and categories that we do? In this lecture, Jason Lerch explored that question: What do modern ways of looking at brains and genes tell us about autism –  or autisms  –  and its relation to attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other related disorders of brain development? He presented the unfolding view that separating individual disorders is difficult while at the same time there are not enough categories to make sense of a complex mix of symptoms, genes, and signatures in the brain.

About the Speaker

Jason Lerch is the director of preclinical imaging at the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging at the University of Oxford. Before his move to Oxford in 2019, he spent 14 years at the Mouse Imaging Centre at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. He completed his Ph.D. in 2005 in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. Lerch received his B.A. in 1999 in anthropology and social studies of medicine from McGill University. His Ph.D. research, under the supervision of Alan Evans, was on in vivo measurements of cortical thickness from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). His research focus is on detecting changes in the brain due to behavioral and genetic manipulations in tightly-controlled mouse models, primarily related to neurodevelopmental disorders, and to relate these findings to not-as-well-controlled human individuals.

Past Lectures

Rare variants and the genetics of autism

Evan E. Eichler, Ph.D.Professor, Department of Genome Sciences and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle

On October 21, 2020, Evan Eichler discussed his research on the genetics of autism and related neurodevelopmental conditions.

Phenotyping sleep

Emmanuel Mignot, M.D., Ph.D.Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University

On September 16, 2020, Emmanuel Mignot discussed sleep biology as well as sleep disorders and their impact. He presented a link to what is known on the genetics of sleep and sleep disorders. He emphasized the need for large scale objective sleep recording studies with genomic and proteomic analysis to better understand the molecular pathways regulating sleep and circadian biology.

Progress in understanding the genetic basis of mental health

Benjamin Neale, Ph.D.Associate Professor, Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital
Associate Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Associated Researcher, Broad Institute

On May 6, 2020, Benjamin Neale discussed progress in mapping genetic risk factors for autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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