Arousal, emotion regulation and challenging behaviors: Insights from the Autism Inpatient Collection

  • Autism Research
Speaker Matthew Siegel, M.D.
Tufts University
Date & Time


Tea:
4:15 - 5:00pm
Lecture:
5:00 - 6:15pm

Location

Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium
160 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10010 United States

Autism Research

Autism Research lectures bring together scientists and scholars to discuss diverse and important topics related to autism. The lectures are open to the public and are held at the Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium at the Simons Foundation headquarters in New York City. Tea is served prior to each lecture.

 
On 24 January 2018, Matthew Siegel drew upon a new resource, the Autism Inpatient Collection data set, to offer preliminary insights into the relationships between physiologic arousal, emotion dysregulation and the occurrence of challenging behaviors. Such behaviors may represent an attempt to modulate physiologic arousal in minimally verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

His talk was part of the Simons Foundation Autism Research lecture series.

About the Lecture

Emotional and behavioral dysregulation are the primary characteristics youth with autism present in clinical settings and are highly predictive of caregiver stress. But the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena are not well understood. These challenges are compounded for youth who are minimally verbal or have an intellectual disability.

In this lecture, Matthew Siegel drew upon a new resource, the Autism Inpatient Collection data set, to offer preliminary insights into the relationships between physiologic arousal, emotion dysregulation and the occurrence of challenging behaviors. Such behaviors may represent an attempt to modulate physiologic arousal in minimally verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Siegel presented pilot data, using machine learning approaches, that identify physiologic arousal as a biomarker of distress in ASD and that illustrate an opportunity to predict the onset of challenging behavior in real time. This work seeks to address the critical, parent-identified issue of uncertainty regarding when a challenging behavior may occur and may open new avenues for intervention.

About the Speaker

Matthew Siegel is an associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine, the vice president for medical affairs, developmental disorders service at Maine Behavioral Healthcare, and a faculty scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute.  He attended Amherst College, Stanford Medical School and trained at Brown University in child psychiatry, psychiatry, and pediatrics. Siegel is the principal investigator of the Autism Inpatient Collection and is an expert in the inpatient treatment of challenging behaviors in individuals with autism and other developmental disorders.

Past Lectures

On the road to precision health: Brain-based biomarkers in autism spectrum disorder

Shafali Spurling Jeste, M.D.Associate Professor in Psychiatry, Neurology and Pediatrics, University of California, Los Angeles
Director, Developmental Neurophysiology Lab, Center for Autism Research and Treatment, University of California, Los Angeles

On 7 February 2018, Shafali Spurling Jeste provided a topical overview of the current state of research in autism biomarkers. She shared data from studies of autism biomarkers in three key areas: early risk prediction (studies of high-risk infants), heterogeneity within the autism spectrum and genetically defined subgroups within autism. Finally, she discussed the challenges around clinical trial design and development and considered how more objective measures of brain function can improve clinical trials.

Arousal, emotion regulation and challenging behaviors: Insights from the Autism Inpatient Collection

Matthew Siegel, M.D.Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Tufts University
Vice President, Medical Affairs, Developmental Disorders Service, Maine Behavioral Healthcare

On 24 January 2018, Matthew Siegel drew upon a new resource, the Autism Inpatient Collection data set, to offer preliminary insights into the relationships between physiologic arousal, emotion dysregulation and the occurrence of challenging behaviors. Such behaviors may represent an attempt to modulate physiologic arousal in minimally verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

Autism genetics: Searching for coherence

Daniel Geschwind, M.D., Ph.D.Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

On 28 November 2017, Daniel Geschwind discussed his group’s use of RNA sequencing, chromatin structure and gene networks to help develop an understanding of potential convergent mechanisms in autism spectrum disorders.

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive SFARI funding announcements and news