Arousal, emotion regulation and challenging behaviors: Insights from the Autism Inpatient Collection

  • Autism Research
Speaker Matthew Siegel, M.D.
Tufts University
Date & Time


Location

Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium
160 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10010 United States

Autism Research

Autism Research lectures bring together scientists and scholars to discuss diverse and important topics related to autism. The lectures are open to the public and are held at the Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium at the Simons Foundation headquarters in New York City. Tea is served prior to each lecture.

 
On 24 January 2018, Matthew Siegel drew upon a new resource, the Autism Inpatient Collection data set, to offer preliminary insights into the relationships between physiologic arousal, emotion dysregulation and the occurrence of challenging behaviors. Such behaviors may represent an attempt to modulate physiologic arousal in minimally verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

His talk was part of the Simons Foundation Autism Research lecture series.

About the Lecture

Emotional and behavioral dysregulation are the primary characteristics youth with autism present in clinical settings and are highly predictive of caregiver stress. But the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena are not well understood. These challenges are compounded for youth who are minimally verbal or have an intellectual disability.

In this lecture, Matthew Siegel drew upon a new resource, the Autism Inpatient Collection data set, to offer preliminary insights into the relationships between physiologic arousal, emotion dysregulation and the occurrence of challenging behaviors. Such behaviors may represent an attempt to modulate physiologic arousal in minimally verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Siegel presented pilot data, using machine learning approaches, that identify physiologic arousal as a biomarker of distress in ASD and that illustrate an opportunity to predict the onset of challenging behavior in real time. This work seeks to address the critical, parent-identified issue of uncertainty regarding when a challenging behavior may occur and may open new avenues for intervention.

About the Speaker

Matthew Siegel is an associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine, the vice president for medical affairs, developmental disorders service at Maine Behavioral Healthcare, and a faculty scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute.  He attended Amherst College, Stanford Medical School and trained at Brown University in child psychiatry, psychiatry, and pediatrics. Siegel is the principal investigator of the Autism Inpatient Collection and is an expert in the inpatient treatment of challenging behaviors in individuals with autism and other developmental disorders.

Past Lectures

The predictive impairment hypothesis in autism: An empirical assessment

Pawan Sinha, Ph.D.Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dagmar Sternad, Ph.D.Professor, Departments of Biology, Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Physics, Northeastern University

On December 12, 2018, Pawan Sinha and Dagmar Sternad will review a recently proposed hypothesis about the nature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) that posits that the common traits of the disorder are manifestations of an individual’s difficulty in making predictions about cause and effect.

Rethinking autism and animal models: A systems perspective

André Fenton, Ph.D.Professor, Center for Neural Science, New York University

On November 28, 2018, André Fenton discussed work with mouse genetic models of fragile X syndrome (FXS) – the most common single-gene cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms – and focused on the utility of such models to evaluate hypotheses for understanding ASD. He evaluated distinct hypotheses by assessing synapse function and the action potential discharge of knowledge-expressing hippocampus “place cells” during behaviors that require varying cognitive effort.

Thinking differently about neurodevelopmental disorders and autism: Lumping vs. splitting

Evdokia Anagnostou, M.D.Assistant Director, Bloorview Research Institute
Child Neurologist and Senior Clinician Scientist, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto

On September 26, 2018, Evdokia Anagnostou discussed the challenge of rethinking classification systems and diagnostic labels for autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders in light of recent findings from research and clinical studies.

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